Tony Cragg at Houghton Hall Tony Cragg at Houghton Hall

Tony Cragg at Houghton Hall

Until 26 September 2021
Houghton Hall, Norfolk
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Major works by the celebrated British sculptor Tony Cragg are now on view in the grounds and historic interiors of Houghton Hall in Norfolk, one of England's most notable examples of Palladian architecture. Tony Cragg at Houghton is a survey exhibition spanning the past decade, with a particular focus on the artist's most recent works, including new sculptures that have never before been shown in public and were made specifically for the exhibition.

 

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The first things that become apparent in looking at Houghton Hall are the very rigorous symmetry and the strong lines that delineate and divide the even, smooth surfaces of the estate. […] One becomes immediately aware of the degree of control and power needed to structure a space like that. It is an historical power statement, but it is one that is still very effective today.


— Tony Cragg

 

 

Tony Cragg is a master at using the traditional material of bronze in fresh ways. Located on the grass just behind the house is Ferryman (2001), its surface punctured with holes revealing a void within. The sculpture resembles a wild beast on its hind legs, howling – its sound would surely disturb the Lord's herd of English Longhorn cows grazing not far off. Even from this one sculpture, it becomes clear that […] Cragg's plan is to subvert the surroundings.


— Alastair Smart, Telegraph

 

Introducing sculpture into a material situation that is governed by rigorous rules and powerful structures creates an interesting dynamic. […]...
Introducing sculpture into a material situation that is governed by rigorous rules and powerful structures creates an interesting dynamic. […]...
Introducing sculpture into a material situation that is governed by rigorous rules and powerful structures creates an interesting dynamic. […]...

 

Introducing sculpture into a material situation that is governed by rigorous rules and powerful structures creates an interesting dynamic. […] Standing on those open planes the figurative verticality of the sculpture becomes boldly apparent and even though they are a long way from one another you become aware of a vis-à-vis relationship amongst the separate pieces.

— Tony Cragg

 

Integers, 2021
Wood
180 x 91 x 131 cm (70.9 x 35.8 x 51.6 in)

Pair, 2019
Stainless steel
Two parts, 295 x 74 x 68 cm (116.1 x 29.1 x 26.8 in), 272 x 71 x 66 cm (107 x 28 x 26 in)

Untitled, 2020
Wood
190 x 283 x 201 cm (74.8 x 111.4 x 79.1 in)

 

The way it looks in the landscape really transforms the whole experience of [Cragg's] sculpture. The changing light qualities, the opportunity to approach it from different angles and viewpoints seem to extend the potential of the work.

— Peter Murray, Founding Director, Yorkshire Sculpture Park

 

 

The majority of the works on display have been created over the last ten years and come from the artist's own collection. Many have not been exhibited before, and two of the large-scale works […] were made especially for this show. Visitors will find a great breadth of work both in the interior spaces and the wider landscape.

— Lord Cholmondeley of Houghton Hall

 

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